Was shooting gorilla Cincinnati Zoo

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(CNN) Zookeepers shot and killed a rare gorilla on Sunday after a 3 year old boy slipped into its enclosure at the Cincinnati Zoo, triggering outcry over how the situation was handled.

If they had to do it again,Cheap Jerseys free shipping they would respond the same way, the zoo’s director said Monday.

Cincinnati Zoo Director Thane Maynard said he stands by the decision to kill 17 year old silverback Harambe to save the child. The boy went under a rail, through wires and over a moat wall to get into the enclosure, according to the zoo. Footage shot by a witness shows Harambe dragging the child through the water as the clamor of the crowd grows louder.

Zookeepers shot the 450 pound gorilla with a rifle, rather than tranquilizing him. The brief encounter sparked widespread Internet outrage over the decision to shoot Harambe and whether the child’s parents were to blame for failing to look after him.

But those second guessing the call “don’t understand silverback gorillas,” Maynard said in a news conference. And, they were not there when it was time to make the crucial decision.

“That child’s life was in danger. People who question that don’t understand you can’t take a risk with a silverback gorilla this is a dangerous animal,” he said. “Looking back, we’d make the same decision. The child is safe.”

‘We made a difficult call’

The family was visiting the zoo on Saturday when the boy slipped away and entered the enclosure. Kimberley Ann Perkins O’Connor, who captured part of the incident on her phone, told CNN she overheard the boy joking to his mother about going into the water. Then, suddenly, there he was, being dragged by Harambe.

The unidentified boy was taken to Children’s Hospital and released Saturday evening. The family thanked the zoo in a statement through a public relations firm:

“We are so thankful to the Lord that our child is safe. He is home and doing just fine. We extend our heartfelt thanks for the quick action by the Cincinnati Zoo staff. We know that this was a very difficult decision for them, and that they are grieving the loss of their gorilla. We hope that you will respect our privacy at this time.”

Some suggested the boy’s parents should be held criminally responsible for the incident. An online petition seeking “Justice for Harambe” earned more than 100,000 signatures in less than 48 hours.

“This beautiful gorilla lost his life because the boy’s parents did not keep a closer watch on the child,” the petition states.

Cincinnati Police Lt. Stephen Saunders said he is “not aware of any intention to charge the mother” or “the parents” at this time.

Maynard refused to point fingers at the child’s family.

“We had a very difficult situation and we made a difficult call at the end. I’m not here to point fingers about fault,” he said.

“We live in the real world, we make real decisions. People and kids can climb over barriers. We work hard to make sure this zoo is safe. People can climb over barriers, that’s what happened.”

He also defended the enclosure barriers, saying the zoo has been inspected by both the USDA and the Association of Zoos and Aquariums. He compared the scenario to a locked car that burglars find their way into if they try hard enough.

He also pointed out this was the first breach of the exhibit in 38 years of existence.

“The barriers are safe. They exceed any required protocols. The trouble with barriers, whatever the barrier is, some people get past it,” he said. “The zoo is not negligent.”

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